Grad Schools

Japanese Version of China Initiative Raises Questions for Universities

Earlier last month, Japan’s parliament passed an economic security bill to increase government oversight of science and technologies. Of the four broad areas the law is set to cover, securing and protecting research data and patents on advanced technologies is one of them. The Japanese government primarily introduced the law following its closest ally — the United States — to decouple technologically with China for security purposes. With the physical realization of Russia’s increasing aggression on the world stage through its invasion of Ukraine, the parliament had another great cause…

Business Schools Prepare Students To Fight Financial Crimes. Yet, Challenges Remain

The history of financial crimes likely stretches back millenniums starting with humanity’s use of monetary means. As civilizations modernized with laws to prohibit such crimes and to protect citizens, the fight against white-collar crimes has begun. However, to do so, not only knowledge of the law and legal system but also a profound understanding of finance is essential. Responding to a surge of scams, the enlarging underregulated cryptocurrency market, and Russian oligarchs’ continuous attempts to work around the international sanctions over the country’s invasion of Ukraine, finance faculties at business…

The New “High Potential Individual” Visa in the UK Receives Criticism

Starting on May 30, recent graduates of top global universities are allowed to stay in the United Kingdom for a maximum of three years, with a new scheme called a High Potential Individual (HPI) visa. The applicants must have graduated from an eligible university within five years, and once accepted, college graduates will be allowed to stay for two years at most or three years for Ph.D. or other doctoral degrees. The government only briefly describes on their website what the new visa holders can and cannot do, and yet,…

The Future of Law School Admissions Without LSAT — or Any Standardized Tests — is in Sight

On April 25, 2022, the Strategic Review Committee of the American Bar Association (ABA) released a memorandum recommending law schools stop requiring standardized tests, such as the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), for their admissions. Ever since its first administration in 1948, the LSAT has continuously exerted exceptional influence on many aspects of law schools. Unlike college admissions, standardized test scores (i.e., LSAT) have been the single most dominant factor for applicants to care for in their application process, followed closely by undergraduate GPA….

History of Legal Challenges Against Affirmative Action in Higher Education

Higher education institutions across the U.S. adopted race-conscious admissions policies to increase diversity for historically disadvantaged minority students in the late 1960s, complying with the government’s affirmative action. Since then, however, there have been numerous legal challenges against the policies and affirmative action at large. Most recently in January of this year, the Supreme Court of the United States consolidated two legal cases against Harvard University and the University of North Carolina (UNC). The lawsuits were brought by an anti-race conscious admissions advocacy group, arguing that the institutions’ admissions policies have discriminated…

Growing Emphasis on Data Analytics in MBAs

Technical know-how and an understanding of data strategy are two factors that can improve MBA graduates’ career prospects Data analytics is becoming an increasingly important and prominent aspect to consider for many MBAs. A recent study conducted by MBA Roundtable revealed that the majority (61 percent) of schools surveyed intend to overhaul their curriculum in the near future, putting a greater emphasis on analytics. It is reasonable for business schools to aim to equip graduates with the skills demanded by the modern labor market as a response to recent changes…

Swiss Universities With Odd Accreditation and Recognition System

Switzerland had frequently been an education destination for many European college students as the Erasmus program, a pan-European college credit sharing system, used to encompass Swiss universities. However, following the Swiss’ decision to re-introduce quotas on EU citizens in 2014, the education authorities of the EU excluded the country from their program. Since then, Swiss has been negotiating terms with the EU to re-join Erasmus. One of the main reasons why Swiss became a major Erasmus destination for European students is their global, if not euro-wide, reputation for high-quality education….

The Return of International MBA Students

Foreign students have returned to pre-pandemic levels. Hare announced(March 13, 2022), “International student numbers at universities have bounced back to above pre-pandemic levels, with the number of students commencing studies higher than in 2019″.” This is encouraging news, but the flow will take time to manifest at the MBA level across the country. What we do know is that the Australian MBA is still in high demand, both from public and private institutions, also having high demand in international MBA students. According to ICEF, “the market is beginning to recover:…

Applications for MBAs are Increasing with the economy

Demand for shorter MBAs has grown to improve return on investment  Since prospective students prefer fast-track courses that concentrate on career development and pay less for their degree, MBA courses are changing to meet varying demands. The robust economy has strengthened the appeal of shorter MBA degrees, which provide a quick return on investment and allow students to make up for lost income. Fast-track programs are in great demand, according to the Graduate Management Admission Council, with 47% of prospective students enthusiastic about them, the strongest demand in a decade….

MBA’s Case Study Method Still Stands Strong

Although the case study method has received criticism for its shortcomings, numerous business schools still use it as a core part of their teaching for a reason Harvard Business School (HBS) first adopted the case study method in 1921 to allow students to apply theories in practice as they delve into real-world cases. Ever since then, the method has been used as a dominant approach to teaching at a large number of business schools. In recent years, however, some critics have pointed out that the method is outdated, for it…