Author: Lauren Robinson

The Growing Popularity of Online High Schools and How To Choose One

As Covid-19 hits the education institutions hard, many are turning virtual — virtual online classes are now on the rise, as many people are paying attention to virtual classes, even with receiving diplomas through online schools, with the benefits of enjoying more flexible schedules as well as the benefit of choosing the learning environments. Online learning allows students to work at their own pace and eliminates social distractions. According to National Society of High School Scholars, online schools would help students with time management and independence skills in general. These…

To Address the Teacher Shortage, Standards for Becoming a Teacher Have Been Lowered.

What is Teacher Certification? Teacher certification is a proof-based promise that allows teacher candidates to become teachers. Holding a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university and typically must complete a teacher preparation program are required for teacher certification – Arizona uses a two-tier system in which educators first apply for the initial 3-year provisional certificate appropriate to the area of teaching focus and then advance to the 6-year standard certificate after earning teaching experience. What are the current issues confronting educators? According to weareteachers.com, 55 percent of educators…

Here’s How Colleges and Universities Are Reacting to Ukraine’s Invasion

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has killed and injured countless people, making it “one of the most defiant terrorist attacks in European history.” According to NPR, the Russian missile struck a crowded shopping mall in the central Ukrainian city of Kremenchuk. This war has impacted in every area, including geopolitics, foods and economics, energy, and security, causing shortages of wheat, barley, corn, and other grains and pushing millions of people into hunger, as well as energies that most of the European Unions have been relying on to Russia, has faced Russia’s…

Why Has Asian American Gun Ownership Increased Since COVID-19?

Following the release of Covid-19 in China, people began to express their rage toward all Asian Americans living in the United States, displaying discrimination in both physical and verbal abuse, as in the case of six Asian women who were victims of Asian Hate crime in Atlanta. According to NBC News, anti-Asian hate crime increased by 339 percent in 2021 compared to 2020, with approximately 10,380 reports of hate incidents from March 2020 to September 2021, primarily in city areas such as New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, and…

Students Are Now Subjected to Sexual Assault in Schools, in Addition to Shootings

K-12 Education is in danger of collapsing, resulting in a slew of tragic and revolting events. Not only have shootings occurred, but sexual assault has also occurred in schools, making parents fearful. Schools are supposed to teach, but it is becoming increasingly dangerous for parents to rely on them. Kevin McLean, a 30-year-old school administrator who works as both a teacher and a coach at Dripping Springs Middle School, has been accused of having an inappropriate relationship with multiple students aged 12 to 14 – and this was discovered when…

How Are Schools Responding to Gun Violence?

Following the heartbreaking shooting incident in Ulvade, Texas, CBS News conducted a poll among parents about gun violence in schools. According to the poll, 35% of parents were very concerned about gun violence at their children’s school, 37% were somewhat concerned, and 28% were not very concerned or not at all concerned. As previously stated, parents of school-age children are concerned about gun violence at school. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 43 school shootings with fatalities and 50 shootings with injuries occurred in 2020-2021, for a…

Absenteeism as a COVID-19 Effect — How Do Schools Respond?

Absenteeism rates may be difficult to track due to differences in report preparation; however, the pandemic has reduced school absenteeism — teachers are struggling to keep students on track. The percentage of chronically absent students increased by 9.2 percent between 2019-20 and 2020-21, according to the National School Boards Association, while the state average increased by 6.8 percent. The US Government Accountability Office also reported that approximately 1.1 million teachers had at least one student who never showed up in class for the 2020-21 school year, regardless of the teaching…

College Students’ Depression Has Worsened; Here Are Some Solutions

COVID-19 has increased depression among college students. According to the National Library of Medicine, COVID-19 increased stress and anxiety in 138 of 195 participants, but only 10 sought mental health counseling – the most common stressors were found to be loneliness and isolation from the pandemic effect, due to a lack of face-to-face activities. However, depression in college students had become increasingly common even before COVID, with counseling services unable to track college depression rates. Furthermore, college enrollment has declined since the pandemic. According to an Imagine America Foundation study,…

I Made It to College! Now What To Prepare?

Does college matter? It’s that time of year when high school students’ efforts pay off — a time to feel relieved after putting in a lot of effort studying, finishing required high school courses, and receiving a long-awaited college acceptance letter. Unfortunately, high school graduates frequently wait until the last minute before the start of the fall semester and miss out on the opportunity to get to know their future college better. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, individuals with only a high school diploma had a median weekly…

Race-conscious College Admissions Policies at Risk

The Supreme Court of the United States will reconsider the role of race in college admissions once again, hearing a case challenging 50-plus years of systematic effort to increase diversity in the nation’s higher education. The legal challenges to remove race-conscious admissions, which came about in compliance with affirmative action in the 1960s, have been posed by numerous parties since 1978. Most recently, such an attempt was made in late January of this year when the court agreed to hear two cases against Harvard University and the University of North…